Siltech: Fostering a cleaner Africa through Electric Vehicle production

June 07, 2021 00:16:34
Siltech: Fostering a cleaner Africa through Electric Vehicle production
Built in Africa
Siltech: Fostering a cleaner Africa through Electric Vehicle production
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Hosted By

Emmanuel Paul

Show Notes

In this episode of Built in Africa, we examine how Nigerian e-mobility company, Savenhart Technology Limited (Siltech), wants to foster a cleaner Africa through Electric Vehicles production.

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