Bonus: Building global products with African design, a discussion

January 11, 2021 00:34:26
Bonus: Building global products with African design, a discussion
Built in Africa
Bonus: Building global products with African design, a discussion
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Hosted By

Emmanuel Paul

Show Notes


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Narrator: Intro

The speakers on the panel, in the order that you hear them are:

Panel session

01:36 – What does building products with African design mean to you (panelist)?

06:29 – What roles do languages and currency play in building products for Africans?

10:22 – Other specific considerations to keep in mind when building for different African regions

16:00 – Post-COVID, do product teams really need to be on the ground to build products that solve real problems for Africans?

17:37 – What are some frameworks, tools and platforms that African product designers can use to reach more people like them?

19:04 – Oluwatobi on whether product teams need to be on ground

21:52 – Building digital solutions that solve actual problems

28:55 – Audience question: Recommendations for first-time founders on getting their product into the market.

Narrator: Outro

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