Bonus: Secure digital currencies for the future of Africa, a discussion.

March 22, 2021 00:34:28
Bonus: Secure digital currencies for the future of Africa, a discussion.
Built in Africa
Bonus: Secure digital currencies for the future of Africa, a discussion.
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Hosted By

Emmanuel Paul

Show Notes

Build the money of the future at https://currency.techpoint.africa/

Image by WorldSpectrum from Pixabay


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