Built in Africa

Built in Africa is a podcast that puts the spotlight on African startups, innovators and everything that makes them tick. Follow us on social media @BinAfripod Fan mail: [email protected] Ad placements: [email protected]

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Latest Episodes

February 08, 2021 00:10:42
Vybe: Matchmaking for Africans by Africans

Vybe: Matchmaking for Africans by Africans

Credits: Photo by Iwaria FULL TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Where would you rather find love? From your inner circle? You know, leave fate to bring your soulmate your way. Or would go the unconventional way, scrolling through a list of potential partners from the comfort of your room? Maybe unconventional sounds easier and quicker, but what about trust issues and the general cultural bias, particularly in this part of the world? As unpopular as the terrain is in Africa, the online dating industry continues to attract a fair number of tech entrepreneurs. Adetolani Eko, Moronke Anifowose and Osagie Omonzokpia make up a team of such entrepreneurs.  On this episode of Built in Africa, we focus on Vybe, a Nigerian online dating startup that is designed to help Africans connect with other Africans both online and offline infuses a conventional touch into the online matchmaking process to retain the regular style of dating. The software engineering trio of Adetolani, Moronke and Osagie began their foray into the business of love in April 2019. But it wasn’t without the initial skepticism. Adetolani: We were a bit sceptical about it in the sense that there was no market leader that I could say, okay this is who we are following for this particular continent.  Narrator: That’s Adetolani Eko, co-founder and CEO of Vybe. By the way, Vybe is spelt VYBE. Adetolani: We decided to carry out some surveys and customer interviews. So we called different people we knew and also strangers. We didn’t tell them what we were working on, we just sort of asked them “what they thought about online dating? What are the general issues you face while looking for somebody or finding a ...

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January 25, 2021 00:14:04
Selar: End-to-end eCommerce platform for Africa’s passion economy

Selar: End-to-end eCommerce platform for Africa’s passion economy

This episode is brought to you by HostGator, web hosting that scales from easy to expert. Visit builtin.africa/hostgator to get up to 60% off on your purchases. Credits: FULL TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Since 2008, after the likes of Uber and Airbnb ushered in the era of on-demand marketplaces, hardly a quarter has gone by without a new ‘Uber for X’ launching, at least in the US and other developed countries. On-demand marketplaces made the sharing economy thrive. An economic model for peer-to-peer-based activities, the sharing economy allowed people to monetise their time for specific tasks or services. These marketplaces also automated the matching of supply and demand, as well as pricing. Despite the many benefits of the sharing and gig economy, workers usually find what they do one-dimensional, prioritising consistency and efficiency over individuality. Enter the passion economy, a model that allows individuals to monetise their skills. On this episode of Built in Africa, we put the spotlight on how eCommerce platform, Selar is working to grow Africa’s passion economy. Digital platforms that employ the passion economy model like YouTube, Substack, and OnlyFans highlight the user’s individuality. These platforms can be very niche, though, leaving a variety of content uncatered for. In the same vein, some kinds of content would flop on these global platforms. However, they’d do well on a niche geographical platform. Selar is one of such startups trying to take advantage of this opportunity. Based in Lagos, Nigeria, Selar (spelt S-E-L-A-R) wants to help Africans monetise their skill, knowledge, and content from anywhere in the world. Douglas Kendyson: So if somebody is like writing like an eBook or if somebody is creating like a course. Narrator: That was Douglas Kendyson, founder and CEO ...

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January 18, 2021 01:52:33
Bonus: Town Hall meeting with Peter Salovey, President of Yale University

Bonus: Town Hall meeting with Peter Salovey, President of Yale University

This episode is extracted from a Techpoint town hall meeting with Peter Salovey, president of Yale University, enjoy. Build the money of the future at https://currency.techpoint.africa/ ...

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January 11, 2021 00:34:26
Bonus: Building global products with African design, a discussion

Bonus: Building global products with African design, a discussion

Build the money of the future at https://currency.techpoint.africa/ Narrator: Intro The speakers on the panel, in the order that you hear them are: Panel moderator, Christine Edith Dikongué. She is the co-founder of AfricaHacks, a digital startup mentorship platform.Wiza Jalakasi, Head of Global BD & Research, Hover Developer Services and;Oluwatobi Otokiti, founder, ProductDive & Senior Growth Product Manager at Flutterwave Panel session 01:36 – What does building products with African design mean to you (panelist)? 06:29 – What roles do languages and currency play in building products for Africans? 10:22 – Other specific considerations to keep in mind when building for different African regions 16:00 – Post-COVID, do product teams really need to be on the ground to build products that solve real problems for Africans? 17:37 – What are some frameworks, tools and platforms that African product designers can use to reach more people like them? 19:04 – Oluwatobi on whether product teams need to be on ground 21:52 – Building digital solutions that solve actual problems 28:55 – Audience question: Recommendations for first-time founders on getting their product into the market. Narrator: Outro Please subscribe, share and drop a review of this podcast, by searching for ‘Built in Africa’ on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, iHeartRadio or wherever you get your podcasts. You can also email us feedback at [email protected] For more stories on startups and innovation in Africa, please visit techpoint.africa ...

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December 28, 2020 00:14:20
TalentQL: Building a pipeline of quality African talent for the world

TalentQL: Building a pipeline of quality African talent for the world

This episode is brought to you by PureVPN; a secure, fast, private, and unrestricted way to access the internet. FULL TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Africa!!! Home to 1.25 billion people, over 60% aged 25 and below. With such a youthful population, it is no surprise that potential talent abounds, especially in cutting edge sectors like tech. And with thousands of tech companies already established and hundreds more coming up, quality is brewing every day. Over the past decade, a variety of tech talent companies have sprung forth on the continent, with the primary aim of connecting said talents to local and international clients. Names like Lagos and San-Francisco based Andela and Ethiopian-based Gebeya come to mind. But for Adewale Yusuf, ex-publisher of Nigerian-based tech publication, Techpoint Africa, these names were just scratching the surface. More work needed to be done. On this episode of the Built in Africa, we put the spotlight on how Nigerian-based startup, TalentQL, wants to build a pipeline of quality African talent for local and international companies. Adewale would better appreciate the intricacies of the market in 2018 when Techpoint Africa held its first African tech talent meetup in Europe. This was done in partnership with US-based seed accelerator, Techstars. Majority of the people in attendance were software engineers who originally plied their trade in Africa but now led dev teams in Berlin and other parts of Europe.   Adewale Yusuf: From the developers that came, one thing I realised is, the only thing Africa has to offer the world is talent. Narrator: That’s Adewale Yusuf.  Inspired by the quality of talent present, he made up his mind to ...

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December 21, 2020 00:16:05
Afrikrea: Building the online infrastructure for African culture commerce

Afrikrea: Building the online infrastructure for African culture commerce

This episode is brought to you by PureVPN; a secure, fast, private, and unrestricted way to access the internet. FULL TRANSCRIPT Narrator: Growing up in Mali, Moulaye Tabouré was quite passionate about art and fashion. His studies took him to France, where he noticed the trend of Europeans taking particular interest in art and fashion depicting African culture. Moulaye Tabouré: We realised that first, a lot of the artisans’ work that we had and came with from Africa were actually very praised and looked forward to in Europe Narrator: That’s Moulaye Tabouré, co-founder and CEO of Ivorian-based eCommerce platform, Afrikrea. In 2010, after over 5 years studying in France, Moulaye returned to Mali to work as an auditor with PricewaterhouseCoopers and, later, Alstrom. It was during this period that Mali came under intense pressure from militant Islamist terror groups like Ansar Dine. Moulaye Tabouré: So the country was closing up; less and less tourism. Meaning more and more artisans were actually struggling to keep up. So they were starting to move away from ancestral craftsmanship to going to work, for example, in the mines just trying to survive and make ends meet for their families Narrator: Meanwhile, a different group of designers began to gain international recognition from names like Burberry and IKEA fabrics because of their modern twist to African fashion. Moulaye says these separate events led him to seriously consider how best to help African designers overcome their dependence on tourism to sell their products.  On this episode of Built in Africa, we put the spotlight on how Ivorian startup, Afrikrea, is building the online infrastructure for African culture commerce. Moulaye quickly realised that he could not start this project ...

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